The Week Ahead: June 7 to 13

Tuesday

“The Art of Caring” exhibition at Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale, One E. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; $7 to $10 or free for museum members; 954/525-5000 or www.moafl.org

Inspired in part by the Museum of Modern Art’s legendary “Family of Man” exhibition from 1955, this inspirational photography show, which opened last weekend, is sure to make your emotions swell. The 200 photographs, which cut a broad swath from established masters to emerging artists, are divided into seven moving categories: “Children and Family,” “Love,” “Wellness,” “Healing,” “Disaster,” “Aging” and “Remembering.” The show runs through Sept. 25, and look for a full review of it in this blog later this month.

Thursday to Sunday

Hukilau Festival at the Bahia Cabana, Bahia Mar and Mai-Kai restaurants in Fort Lauderdale; $12 to $110; www.thehukilau.com

This one-of-a-kind festival, now celebrating its 10th anniversary, brings Hawaii to Fort Lauderdale for four days and nights of rum-soaked, lei-clothed, delightfully kitschy entertainment. The Hukilau includes a shopping bazaar full of tiki gifts, a master mixologist’s challenge, art exhibits, fascinating symposiums, book signings and live music from such genre masters as the Intoxicators, Grinder Nova and The Exotics. The festivities conclude with a Dick Dale memorabilia signing at 4 p.m. Sunday (for more on Dale, see the “Monday” entry in this week’s column). Visit the Hukilau website for a detailed event schedule.

Thursday

Opening night of “Fool For Love” at Alliance Theatre Lab, 6766 Main Street, Miami Lakes; 8 p.m.; 305/259-0418 or www.thealliancetheatrelab.com

Just as the Mosaic Theatre continues its stellar run of Sam Shepard’s latest play, “Ages of the Moon,” in Plantation, this scrappy Miami Lakes playhouse opens its own Shepard revival. Having been adapted into a 1985 film by Robert Altman, “Fool for Love” is one of the legendary playwright’s most renowned works. This four-character piece follows a pair of bickering lovers in a shabby motel room at the edge of the Mojave Desert, traversing the pastoral, tragicomic territory Shepard has honed over nearly 40 works.

Screening of “Memories of Overdevelopment” at the Tower Theatre, 1508 S.W. Eighth St., Miami; 7 p.m.; $10; 305/643-8706

Forty-three years after the landmark film “Memories of Underdevelopment” put Cuba on the art-house cinema map, writer-director Miguel Coyula

gives us this sequel/response, centering on a Cuban intellectual who flees his underdeveloped homeland only to find deeper ambiguities in the “developed world.” A sort of collage-style docudrama that integrates footage of Bill Clinton and Fidel Castro, this powerful essay film earned buckets of praise from Sundance, where it premiered, calling to mind the polemical and inquisitive movies of Jean-Luc Godard. Coyula will appear for a live Q&A following this one-night-only screening in Miami.

Friday

Pocket of Lollipops at Grand Central, 697 N. Miami Ave., Miami; 11 p.m.; free; 305/377-2277 or www.grandcentralmiami.com

I never thought we needed another husband-and-wife duo on drums and guitar until I heard the strange, compelling, dissonant music of Pocket of Lollipops. This Miami duo fell into music after excelling at the other arts: Maite Urrechaga is a visual artist and Tony Kapel is a writer and filmmaker. The music they make together channels the energy, spontaneity and antiestablishment ethos of the New York No Wave movement of the early ‘80s – many of whose band members also dabbled in other art forms – creating an exciting antidote to the increasing sameness of so much indie rock today. They perform alongside Arsenal 88 and Sirens and Sealions.

Saturday

Joel McHale at Hard Rock Live at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, 5747 Seminole Way, Hollywood; 8 p.m.; $49 to $79; 800/745-3000 orwww.seminolehardrockhollywood.com

Thirty-nine year-old actor-comedian Joel McHale has appeared in more than 20 film and television projects since 2004, but he remains most famous for mocking the very pop culture establishment in which he occasionally partakes. As host of “The Soup” on the E! network, McHale has become the authority on bad reality TV, delivering wicked, snarky barbs at targets like the Kardashians, “American Idol” contestants and other unwitting celebrities.

The first “Authors Academy” workshop at Murder on the Beach, 273 Pineapple Grove Way, Delray Beach; 10 a.m. to noon; $25; 561/279-7790 orwww.murderonthebeach.com

Summer is a great time to finally write that first novel you’ve always had percolating in your brain. Murder on the Beach, South Florida’s beloved mystery book nook, is here to help, presenting its first of eight summer workshops with published authors. Titled “Where Does Your Novel Start?,” the workshop will be taught by Randy Rawls, author of six books in the Ace Edwards PI series. The workshops are $25 each, but if you attend all eight, you get one free. Visit the website for future dates and topics.

Second Saturday Art Walk at Design District at Northeast 40th Street and Northeast Second Avenue, Miami; 7 to 10 p.m. (sometimes later); free; www.artcircuits.com

Check out Miami’s Design District for this month’s Second Saturday Art Walk, which offers free wine and appetizers and the first look at new and uncompromising works from some of the area’s cutting-edge artists in modern art-deco settings. I’m looking forward to Caroine Coronel’s “Inferno,” an exhibition inspired by Dante’s literary masterpiece, on display at Granite Transformations; as well as Nate Page’s “Protestor 1,” a show that marries sports fandom with political protests at the More Funner Projects gallery.

Monday

Dick Dale at Respectable Street, 518 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 8 p.m.; $20 in advance or $25 at door; 561/832-9999 or www.respectablestreet.com

Standing out like a groovy thumb amid the indie rock, darkwave and electronic acts that usually populate the stage at this West Palm Beach hipster dive, Dick Dale is a surprising throwback to the music of another generation: the nascent grooves of surf rock, albeit from a more underground aesthetic than the more mainstream Beach Boys. Which is probably why Dale, the so-called “King of the surf guitar,” plays venues like Respectable’s and not, say, the Hard Rock. But you’ve got to hand it to Dale: The guy’s 74 and still riding sonic waves. I can’t think of a better way to spend your Monday night.