Your Week Ahead: Feb. 26 to March 4

Festival of the Arts launches another eclectic program, Ballet Florida goes contemporary at the Kravis, and Boca celebrates Mardi Gras early. Plus, the Fab Faux, MOMIX, Miami Film Festival and more in your week ahead.


WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY

What: “Viva MOMIX”

Where: Broward Center, 201 S.W. Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale

When: 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $49.50-$59.50

Contact: 954/462-0222, browardcenter.org

MOMIX, the influential company founded by choreographer Moses Pendleton, has been at the forefront of dance spectacle for 35 years—an impressive and round number Pendleton will be celebrating at this “greatest hits” tour, titled “Viva MOMIX.” It will feature selections from Pendleton’s five major productions, “Botanica,” “Alchemia,” “Remix,” “Opus Cactus” and “Lunar Sea,” performed by this season’s impossibly talented ensemble. MOMIX dancers don’t just understand jetes and lifts and arabesques; they’re also creative illusionists and master contortionists whose strength and gladiatorial conditioning are put to the test in Pendleton’s mesmerizing, carefully costumed, prop-heavy choreography. For an introduction to MOMIX, this two-hour mixtape couldn’t be more ideal.

THURSDAY

What: Opening night of Festival of the Arts Boca

Where: Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: $50

Contact: 866/571-2787, festivalboca.org

For this year’s annual installment of Boca’s premier cultural festival, a returning favorite will kick off another intellectually robust and variety-filled program. Presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin is back by popular demand on Thursday evening to discuss her latest book, Leadership in Turbulent Times, which draws on insights from the commanders-in-chief she has studied most intensely over her career, such as Lincoln and the two Roosevelts. The conversation will inevitably turn to contemporary politics—aka the history of tomorrow—which Goodwin is equally adept at discussing. Check out the festival’s website for the entire schedule, some of which we’ll be covering here on bocamag.com.

What: Opening night of “A Doll’s House, Part 2”

Where: Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter

When: 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $63-$90

Contact: 561/575-2223, jupitertheatre.org

Playwright Lucas Hnath (of “A Public Reading of an Unproduced Screenplay About the Death of Walt Disney” fame) penned this witty and intellectually robust sequel to Henrik Ibsen’s 19th century masterpiece, in which heroine Nora has returned home from a 15-year absence having become a best-selling advocate of women’s empowerment. Her husband Torvald, who once held all the strings in their bourgeois marriage, has become numb and emasculated, but if played up to par, he earns the audience’s empathy as well. The play is both cutting and poignant, with smatterings of delightfully anachronistic 21st century verbiage as well as lengthy pauses pregnant with unspoken heft. This one-act comedy, timed to resonate with the #TimesUp movement, arrives fresh from its run on Broadway, where it opened last year. It runs through March 10.

FRIDAY

Photo by Jacek Gancarz

What: Director’s Farewell Conversation

Where: Norton Museum of Art, 1450 S. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach

When: 6 p.m.

Cost: Free

Contact: 561/832-5196, norton.org

One of the leaders of the Palm Beach County art world will be stepping down on Friday, and what a tenure she has enjoyed: Hope Alswang, the Norton’s executive director, is in her final week at the museum, after a nine-year stint in which she spearheaded the Norman Foster-designed renovation and expansion and launched numerous programs and initiatives, including the long-overdue RAW: Recognition of Art by Women exhibition series. She leaves behind the legacy of a truly transformed art museum, the process of which will be discussed at this informal Q&A. As Alswang shared with me in a feature forBocamagazine’s February issue, “it’s been nine really intense years. … At minimum, the next phase is going to take five years—which is really strong exhibition and programmatic growth, and fantastic acquisitions.”

What: The Fab Faux

Where: Parker Playhouse, 707 N.E. Eighth St., Fort Lauderdale

When: 8 p.m.

Cost: $64-$121.50

Contact: 954/462-0222, parkerplayhouse.com

With two veterans of late-night bands on its roster—Will Lee from “The Late Show with David Letterman” and Jimmy Vivino from “Late Night with Conan O’Brien”—the Beatles tribute act The Fab Faux is as personable and telegenic as it is musically impeccable. Referred to in Rolling Stoneas “the greatest Beatles cover band … without the wigs,” the Faux is known for tackling Fab Four albums straight through, song for song, note for note, and this annual pilgrimage to Fort Lauderdale is no exception. For the first time in Florida, the group will play the Beatles’ 1965 masterpiece Rubber Soul(“Norwegian Wood,” “Girl,” “Michelle”) and The Beatles’ Second Album(“She Loves You,” “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Please Mr. Postman”) separated by an intermission.

A still from “This Changes Everything”

What: Opening night of Miami Film Festival

Where: Olympia Theater, 174 E. Flagler St., Miami

When: 7 p.m.

Cost: $25 for opening night movie; $95 for opening night party add-on

Contact: miamifilmfestival.com

The Miami Film Festival opens another diverse and multicultural program of global cinema with a documentary that’s closer to home, and that has impacted movies and culture in seismic ways. “This Changes Everything” is the first feature-length doc to reckon with the revelations of the #MeToo movement, exploring women’s empowerment and gender inequities in the film business through the voices of interviewees including Meryl Streep, Sandra Oh, Cate Blanchett and many others. Check the festival’s website for more details on the entire program, but highlights include the Argentinean drama “The Accused” (March 7), about the tabloid media ramifications of a high-profile crime; “Knock Down the House” (March 6-7), a doc about the ascent of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and other Democratic upstarts; “Ash” (March 5 and 9), an atmospheric Hitchcockian thriller from China; and “Screwball” (March 2), local director Billy Corben’s gonzo doc about Major League Baseball’s Biogenesis steroid scandal.

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

What: Ballet Florida’s “PULSE”

Where: Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach

When: 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $35 general, $20 students

Contact: 561/832-7469, kravis.org

Ballet Florida, the beloved Palm Beach County dance institution founded by Marie Hale in 1985, has been much missed since its dissolution in 2009. So when the company was re-launched last spring by new artistic director Lauren Carey, its debut program was appropriately titled “Reawakening.” Now fully woke, Ballet Florida 2.0 returns for its latest Kravis engagement, “PULSE,” a youthful and kinetic contemporary dance showcase exploring “connection, disconnection and the relationship between ourselves and one’s immediate environment.” PULSE is a multimedia program combining Carey’s own world-premiere choreography with contributions from visual artist Amber Tutwiler.

SUNDAY

What: Mardi Gras Jazz Brunch with Dennis Lambert

Where: The Addison, 2 E. Camino Real, Boca Raton

When: 11 a.m.

Cost: $125

Contact: 954/496-0776, arthritisfoundation.org

Mardi Gras in New Orleans isn’t happening until next week, but Boca is getting an early start on the celebration with this high-spirited brunch to benefit the Arthritis Foundation. Expect NOLA-inspired cuisine, flavorful cocktails, a silent auction and live music from a Big Easy-style jazz band. The day also includes a special performance from Boca Raton’s own Dennis Lambert. As a singer-songwriter, Lambert released just one album, 1972’s cult favorite Bags and Things, but it’s his contributions behind the scenes, as a songwriter and producer, that has moved the needle the most: His credits range from “Rhinestone Cowboy” and “We Built this City” to hits for the Four Tops, Temptations and Commodores. At this rare solo piano performance, Lambert will perform many of these numbers, supplementing his set with anecdotes from his career.